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Dan Winter's Cottage & Ancestral Home

Nestling in the heart of Armagh is the Ancestral Home of Dan Winter, one of the founders of the Orange Order.

This early 18th century listed vernacular farmhouse was re-thatched and restored in 2000 with a large proportion of the original fabric having been conserved. The cottage has been maintained by the Winter family down the years, and on display are relics from the Battle of the Diamond and old farming and dairy artefacts. The original timber, used to build the cottage, has just been dated to reveal this is probably one of the last houses to use Irish Oak as a building timber.

The Birth of the orange order
The Lambeg Drum

In a rural townland just outside Armagh City is Dan Winters House and Farmyard, home of the Winter family since 1665. This listed building was made famous following the Battle of the Diamond where the decision to form the Orange Order was taken in the sitting room of the house on 21st September 1795. The house is located 240 yards from the Diamond Crossroads and has been welcoming visitors from across the world for over 200 years.

The Orange Order came into existence after the Battle of the Diamond, near Loughgall, on 21st September 1795. A monument has been erected to commemorate the Battle, dedicated on the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the formation of the Orange Order, 21st September 1995. The ancestral home in the farmyard, called “Dan Winter’s House” – The Birthplace of Orangeism is just a few yards from the actual monument. The battlefield and the cottage are still owned by direct descendants and are open daily for visitors.

Dan Winters is an original mud wall thatched cottage which was built in 1623. The cottage consists of living quarters, spirit grocers and weavers quarters, with a full working loom.

It is situated in the centre of the site where the famous Battle of the Diamond took place in 1795, and its timbers still bear the scorch marks from when the house was set alight during the battle.

At 94ft long it is believed to be the longest thatched cottage in Ireland.This early 18th century listed vernacular farmhouse was re-thatched and restored in 2000 with a large proportion of the original fabric having been conserved. The cottage has been maintained by the Winter family down the years, and on display are relics from the Battle of the Diamond and old farming and dairy artefacts. The original timber, used to build the cottage, has just been dated to reveal this is probably one of the last houses to use Irish Oak as a building timber.

During your visit, join a member of the Winter family in the welcoming surroundings of the old sitting room. Sit around a turf fire and hear about how the Winter family lived, take a stroll around the original farm buildings in the farmyard where artefacts on display include vintage farm machinery or enjoy a tasty treat at the traditional tearooms.

Tours and talks are available by request

Group visits and Lodge meetings must be organized by advanced booking

www.danwinterscottage.com

Opening Hours:

Winter: Monday – Saturday: 10.30am – 5.30pm & Sunday 2pm – 5.30pm

Summer: Monday – Saturday: 10.30am – 8.30pm & Sunday 2pm – 8.30pm

Evening visits on request.

Admission: Prices will be given on request

Directions:

Dan Winter’s House is situated in the farmyard around 200yds from the junction of the Grange Road and the Derryloughan Road.

Tours and talks can be arranged by request

Group visits and Lodge meetings must be organized by advanced booking

Prices on request

Please telephone for group bookings  +44 [0} 28 3885 1344 / 077 6260 5169

Visitors can avail of tea/coffee, scones, tray bakes, sandwiches, homemade apple tart in the delightful traditional tearooms.

9 Derryloughan Road, BT61 8PH Loughgall

Tel +44 [0] 2838851344

Mobile +44[0]7762605169

Email: hildawinter@btinternet.com

www.danwinterscottage.com